Thursday, July 20, 2017

NJ Install WaterFurnace Geothermal heating & cooling PART 1

February 7, 2012 by  
Filed under Guest Articles on Low Cost Heating

Visit www.NJRenewableEnergy.com Interested in a geothermal installation in New Jersey, contact me. RenewableEnergy4@aol.com Global Warming, Peak oil (in connection with war for oil) and the Economy. I am extremely concerned about these issues and I truly believe that our only chance in solving all four is through conservation and clean renewable energy. We as individuals must act now. I have decided as an average citizen to change my own habits and behavior to become apart of the solution and I’m hoping to convince my friends and neighbors to do the same. All of these issues revolve around one problem, our addiction to oil and other fossil fuels. With what I believe is a grass roots movement around the world, I have just begun the systematic process and modification of my home with the idea of conservation and the “soon to be added” production of renewable energy. I hope to be apart of a movement that helps our nation and the world become self reliant in order to save our planet. It is my belief that “we” as Americans can each do our part as individuals with the combined effort to make real change. We do need government help, however it can start in every home in America with the idea of reducing our carbon foot print in an attempt to reduce our effect on the planet as well as our dependency on foreign and domestic oil. We as a nation must lead the world in renewable energy. It will provide our nation with power, stability and a planet that can sustain life.
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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23 Responses to “NJ Install WaterFurnace Geothermal heating & cooling PART 1”
  1. tommy0135 says:

    This administratio is just as addicted to oil as any other. Lybia proves it.

  2. mphello says:

    @the43k Well, maybe if you dug a little deeper, you’d hit magma! (just kidding)

    Great video!

  3. diysolarpanels100 says:

    Thanks for the good time. DS rock!!

  4. M2Lfilms says:

    So you replaced the geothermal hot water tank with a solarthermal hot water tank.

    1. What was the problem with the geothermal hot water tank?

    2. Why did the geothermal hot water tank have to be replaced?

    3. Is the solarthermal hot water tank more efficient than the geothermal hot water tank?

    4. What are the price differences?

    5. Can you post a video answering these questions and explaining so those of us considering installing a system can benefit from the answers?

  5. M2Lfilms says:

    So you replaced the geothermal hot water tank with a solarthermal hot water tank.

    1. What was the problem with the geothermal hot water tank?

    2. Why did the geothermal hot water tank have to be replaced?

    3. Is the solarthermal hot water tank more efficient than the geothermal hot water tank?

    4. What are the price differences?

    5. Can you post a video answering these questions and explaining so those of us considering installing a system can benefit from the answers?

  6. M2Lfilms says:

    So you replaced the geothermal hot water tank with a solarthermal hot water tank.

    1. What was the problem with the geothermal hot water tank?

    2. Why did the geothermal hot water tank have to be replaced?

    3. Is the solarthermal hot water tank more efficient than the geothermal hot water tank?

    4. What are the price differences?

    5. Can you post a video answering these questions and explaining so those of us considering installing a system can benefit from the answers?

  7. the43k says:

    Actually, I think you need to write a letter to the department of energy and explain why you think ground source heat pumps are not a form of renewable energy. I’d argue your first point, but I don’t know what it is.

    DOE- website definition
    The geothermal heat pump, also known as the ground source heat pump, is a highly efficient renewable energy technology that is gaining wide acceptance for both residential and commercial buildings……….

  8. shark2k86 says:

    Two things. First, look at DX Geothermal, as that uses copper pipes so your response to casemon is false. Second, what you installed is not a renewable energy. You are not generating any power. You are transferring heat (either from your home to the ground or vice versa) and then expanding that heat (the heat pump) to make it hotter. But you do not generate any power from this. You should more correctly tell people that you installed a Ground-Source Heat Pump.

  9. polysemousncrk says:

    Free inexhaustible energy is real!But the powerfull Oil business won’t alow common ppl to know this,Go to LT-MAGNET-MOTORdotCOM and get the blueprints for a genuine magnet motor ,Start the energy revolution!

  10. the43k says:

    @daltonagre You are thinking of a different type of geothermal….. We don’t use the magma of the earth to generate steam to make electricity. This is using the ground as a heat exchanger.

  11. daltonagre says:

    Here in Brazil, there’s no electricity being produced from geothermal power.

  12. Pasechnik1 says:

    I cannot believe this monster rig couldn’t dipper and less holes. The hole is too big (water well type). The grout is not high efficient :(

  13. sassylassy526 says:

    The music is annoying.

  14. lavernedi says:

    Free Energy is real and its here but the coverup is strong, if u r interested in a REAL free energy magnet motor then

    just go to LT-MAGNET-MOTORdotCOM and download the blueprints ,it is probably the ONLY working magnet

    motor out there. Join the free energy revolution!!

  15. the43k says:

    @casemon the loops are PVC geothermal grade, they last 50 years. Copper is not an option. Cost is very difficult because there are 20 different variables, including soil type to size of home. it could cost 25k to 45k for a house 2000sqft to 4000sqft. That is before the 30% tax credit and other state rebates. In general the payback is about 7 years and you can expect 50% to 75% reduction in energy costs for heating and cooling.

  16. casemon says:

    Thanks for sharing this. Watching the video in the car with my father, he has a question:

    What material are the loops made from? Was copper considered, given it’s high thermal efficiency?

    Also, what was the total cost, including equipment, landscaping, drilling, materials, etc.?

    +1 for The Zeitgeist Movement; we’re one planet and we can do better than we currently are; we have the means today! GeoThermal is just one piece to solving our shared energy issues.

  17. the43k says:

    The temperatures fluctuate during the seasons. If we started with a temperature of 55 degrees going into winter, at the end of the season, the inline temperatures could be 31 degrees. Generally, the efficiency will be the best during the beginning of each season. Ground coldest at beginning of summer, because of all the heat taken out and ground the warmest at beginning of winter because of all the heat added. As long as you have an 8 degree temperature difference, the system will work properly.

  18. HeavyDemir says:

    what is the coolant temp going in and coming out of the wells ??

  19. the43k says:

    There is some manipulation of price, and some companies are worse than others, however, with geothermal systems, including Waterfurnace, they use very high quality and efficient components. You also need to compare Geo to the highest quality furnace or hybrid unit. Ultimately, it is a different installation process, that many techs don’t know how to do, so at this point its a higher skill level trade, or at least different. So there is a limited number of contractors that have the ability

  20. Sweeeeny says:

    Comparing air-to-air and Geotherm forced air costs. Plumbers hear “Geo” & up go prices. Ducting is the same as is the control electronics. The units have the same components- compressor, condenser, evaporator, etc. 400′ well is app $7.5k installed, glycolled, pumped and presented to the plumber ready to connect. The A to A requires components outside & you need to bury refrigerant & power lines & build a plinth. Difference in price is between $8-$10k extra ignoring the cost of the well. Why?

  21. the43k says:

    @Sweeeeny Agreed. At the time it was 6k to have a mud (sand) driller and about 14k to have a rock driller. With a transition from sand to rock being about 80ft, we’d have to case (steel pipe) all the way to 80 ft. Very expensive, before the 30% federal tax credit and we had limited funds. In the position I’m in now, I’d highly consider what you are suggesting.

  22. Sweeeeny says:

    Curious – why stop at the bedrock? It has much better thermal properties than sand and gravel and I would have thought the equipment you had there would go through it without problem. Two x two hundred would be my choice.

  23. truthteller908 says:

    @the43k I live in Jersey and I’m interested in becoming part of the team. How can I get my foot in the door in this buisness? I’m 27 and have some HVAC experience under my belt already (completed 11month Lincoln Tech HVAC course and have worked for Richards heating and cooling doing residential installations in essex county) and will work for peanuts for the opportunity to gain some geothermal experience.

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